What’s the best way to get introductions to investors?

Mark Suster (Managing Partner at Upfront Ventures)
Founder Showcase – Mark Suster Keynote on Vimeo

I like to say, in the era of social networks if you can’t figure out how to get access to a VC hang up your cleats now. You’re done. Game over. You don’t pass the IQ test.

Bruce Gibney (Former Partner @ Founders Fund)
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup – Class 8 Notes Essay

No senior VC needs to do your investment. You should never forget that. Any senior VC that you’re talking to is already wealthy and has many famous deals to show for it.

Bruce Gibney (Former Partner @ Founders Fund)
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup – Class 8 Notes Essay

Tactically, the first thing to do is find someone who does need to make investments. That can mean finding a senior associate or a principal for your first pitch, not a senior partner. This contravenes the conventional wisdom that holds that you should not to pitch junior people.

Bruce Gibney (Former Partner @ Founders Fund)
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup – Class 8 Notes Essay

Another route you could take is the cold pitch. It’s very simple: You just e-mail your deck to submissions@givenVC.com or call their main line. The only problem with this route is that it has an almost zero percent chance of working. Your pitch will be ignored upon receipt.

Bruce Gibney (Former Partner @ Founders Fund)
Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup – Class 8 Notes Essay

TechCrunch has to run 20 stories a day. Let one of them be about you. If you do it right, VCs might actually approach you. And you won’t have to engineer an aggressive press strategy come product launch.

Roy Bahat (Head at Bloomberg Beta)
Also, Introductions and the “forward intro email”

A good forward intro email: 1. Says why you want to be introduced. 2. Includes its own context — enough about you or your startup so that the receiver understands what’s being asked. Always helpful if it includes what’s special about your startup, increases the likelihood the person will want to meet you. Attach a file if you think it makes sense (a deck, longer summary, screenshot). 3. Uses only as many words as you need — the receiver is going … (read more)

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
How to Raise Money

Before you can talk to investors, you have to be introduced to them. The best type of intro is from a well-known investor who has just invested in you. So when you get an investor to commit, ask them to introduce you to other investors they respect. The next best type of intro is from a founder of a company they’ve funded. You can also get intros from other people in the startup community, like lawyers and reporters.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Should You Introduce Yourself To Me At A Bar? – AVC

I would suggest you walk up to the VC, say “I saw your talk today. It was great. My name is Jane Doe and I’d love to find a suitable time to tell you what I’m working on. I’ll send you an email to follow up. It’s a real pleasure to meet you.” Then make a polite departure.