What’s the best way to come up with your startup idea?

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Projects and Companies – Sam Altman

Companies sound serious. When you start thinking of yourself as a company, you start acting like one. Worst of all, you won’t work on slightly crazy ideas. When you have a company, the clock is ticking and people expect results. It’s far better to be thought of and to think of yourself as a project than a company for as long as possible.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Making other people successful | A Founder’s Notebook

Perhaps every company has a goal that ultimately reduces to (at least) one of these: provide basic necessities; make other people successful; give other people pleasure. Which is yours?

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
How to Be an Expert in a Changing World

I spent a lot of time learning to recognize [good ideas look like bad ideas at first], and the techniques I used may be applicable to ideas in general. The first step is to have an explicit belief in change. Beyond the moderately useful generalization that human nature doesn’t change much, the unfortunate fact is that change is hard to predict. Instead of trying to point yourself in the right direction, admit you have no idea what the right direc… (read more)

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
How to Be an Expert in a Changing World

The way to come up with new ideas is not to try explicitly to, but to try to solve problems and simply not discount weird hunches you have in the process.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
How to Be an Expert in a Changing World

Good new ideas come from earnest, energetic, independent-minded people. [A] trick I’ve found… is to focus initially on people rather than ideas. Though the nature of future discoveries is hard to predict, I’ve found I can predict quite well what sort of people will make them.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Before the Startup

The way to come up with good startup ideas is to take a step back. Instead of making a conscious effort to think of startup ideas, turn your mind into the type that startup ideas form in without any conscious effort.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Schlep Blindness

The trick I recommend is to take yourself out of the picture. Instead of asking “what problem should I solve?” ask “what problem do I wish someone else would solve for me?”

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Startups in 13 Sentences

Let your idea evolve. This is the second half of launching fast. Launch fast and iterate. It’s a big mistake to treat a startup as if it were merely a matter of implementing some brilliant initial idea. As in an essay, most of the ideas appear in the implementing.

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Startup advice, briefly – Sam Altman

You should start with an idea, not a company. When it’s just an idea or project, the stakes are lower and you’re more willing to entertain outlandish-sounding but potentially huge ideas. The best way to start a company is to build interesting projects.

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
A Question – Sam Altman

I think it’s remarkable how much of what people do and use today didn’t exist 10 years ago. I’m always in awe of the remarkable technological progress we make decade over decade. I think its important to try not to lose your sense of wonder about this.

Phil Libin (Co-Founder & CEO of Evernote)
“The Six Crucial Questions for Every Startup Entrepreneur”, by Phil Libin (CEO of Evernote) on Vimeo

Wait until the world changes so that an important problem goes from impossible to just really hard, then execute

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Evidence On Our Smartphones – AVC

The rise of computers that we all carry with us everywhere, and their ability to capture what is going on around them, time stamp it, and geotag it, creates a ton of interesting opportunities. Including law enforcement opportunities. And I think that is a good thing.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Payments Day – AVC

Payments are one of those things that are fundamental to the online experience. And there are large networks that are being built with payments at the core of them.

Eric Ries (Author, The Lean Startup)
The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses

What products do customers really want? How will our business grow? Who is our customer? Which customers should we listen to and which should we ignore? These are the questions that need answering as quickly as possible to maximize a startup’s chances of success. That is what creates value for a startup. (p.181)

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Second Screen, Third Screen, … – AVC

It all makes me wonder if the current crop of social TV apps are missing a big aggregation opportunity. I suspect lots of good stuff was going on elsewhere last night (Facebook, Pinterest, Canvas, etc), but I just didn’t have enough screens in my family room to be everywhere at the same time. Maybe we need an app for that.

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Successful people – Sam Altman

The most successful founders do not set out to create companies. They are on a mission to create something closer to a religion, and at some point it turns out that forming a company is the easiest way to do so.

Bill Gross (CEO Idealab)
Bill Gross: The single biggest reason why startups succeed | TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript | TED.com

If you’re underfunded at first but you’re gaining traction, especially in today’s age, it’s very, very easy to get intense funding.

Bill Gross (CEO Idealab)
Bill Gross: The single biggest reason why startups succeed | TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript | TED.com

Timing accounted for 42 percent of the difference between success and failure. Team and execution came in second, and the idea, the differentiability of the idea, the uniqueness of the idea, that actually came in third.

Bill Gross (CEO Idealab)
Bill Gross: The single biggest reason why startups succeed | TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript | TED.com

I think business model makes sense to be [less important, but still important] because you can start out without a business model and add one later if your customers are demanding what you’re creating.

Bill Gross (CEO Idealab)
Bill Gross: The single biggest reason why startups succeed | TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript | TED.com

What I would say, in summary, is execution definitely matters a lot. The idea matters a lot. But timing might matter even more. And the best way to really assess timing is to really look at whether consumers are really ready for what you have to offer them.

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Before Growth – Sam Altman

In the first few weeks of a startup’s life, the founders really need to figure out what they’re doing and why. Then they need to build a product some users really love. Only after that they should focus on growth above all else.

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: How to talk about your project

What is it for? When someone hires your product or service, what are they hiring it to do? Who (or what) are you trying to change by doing this work? From what to what? How will you know if it’s working? What does it remind me of? Are there parallels, similar projects, things like this that have come before? What’s the difficult part? How much of your time and focus are you spending on the difficult part?