What’s the best way to sell your company?

Ev Williams (CEO of Medium, Co-founder of Twitter)
When to Sell Your Company — Medium

[reasons to sell] 1. The offer captures the upside. Finances are only one perspective, but if you have many shareholders, it’s one you are obligated to take seriously. 2. Imminent threat. 3. Personal choice. Sometimes the founders or other key people may just be done. This is actually quite common and drives a lot of small acquisitions. It doesn’t apply as much as companies get larger, because everyone is (eventually) replaceable—especially if th… (read more)

What’s the best way to sell your company?

Jason Lemkin (Managing Director at Storm Ventures, SaaStr.com)
Bad reasons to sell your startup | A Founder’s Notebook

Do not sell if you are at scale and have a committed team. Do not sell because of the competition, unless they are truly decelerating you and you can’t stop them. Do not sell because you are tired.

What’s the best way to sell your company?

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Don’t Talk to Corp Dev

Before agreeing to meet with someone from corp dev, ask yourselves, “Do we want to sell the company right now?” And if the answer is no, tell them “Sorry, but we’re focusing on growing the company. ” They won’t be offended.

What’s the best way to sell your company?

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Don’t Talk to Corp Dev

Distractions are the thing you can least afford in a startup. One of the tricks to surviving a grueling process is not to stop and think how tired you are. Instead you get into a sort of flow. Imagine what it would do to you if at mile 20 of a marathon, someone ran up beside you and said “You must feel really tired. Would you like to stop and take a rest?” Conversations with corp dev are like that but worse, because the suggestion of stopping get… (read more)

What’s the best way to sell your company?

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Don’t Talk to Corp Dev

Corp dev people’s whole job is to buy companies, and they don’t even get to choose which. The only way their performance is measured is by how cheaply they can buy you, and the more ambitious ones will stop at nothing to achieve that. For example, they’ll almost always start with a lowball offer, just to see if you’ll take it. Even if you don’t, a low initial offer will demoralize you and make you easier to manipulate.

What’s the best way to prioritize product features?

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Startup Playbook

When startups aren’t sure what to do next with their product, or if their product isnt good enough, we send them to go talk to their users. This doesn’t work in every case. It’s definitely true that people would have asked Ford for faster horses but it works surprisingly often. In fact, more generally, when there’s a disagreement about anything in the company, talk to your users.