What’s the best way to interview customers?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Asking or announcing…

We have to create environments where people choose, then ask them why. When you ask someone if they would use your new product, buy your new widget or participate in your new service once it’s ready, you will get a lie in response. People don’t mean to mess you up, but you’ve made the error of asking them to imagine a future they have trouble imagining. It’s incredibly different than asking them to justify what they already do.

What’s the best way to identify opportunities?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Reading between the lines

If you really want to know why someone didn’t like your work, you’re going to have to put a lot more effort into it understanding the person who rejected you. Reading the tea leaves in the rejection letters and one-star reviews is pretty worthless.

What’s the best way to give feedback?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: “When I want your opinion…”

As you get better at your job, people will ask for feedback. The most powerful feedback is based on data and experience. “Actually, no, we shouldn’t put the Crockpots on sale, because every time we run a promo our Crockpot sales have been dwindling, and anyway, the big online store still sells them for less than we do.” These are facts, things we can look up and argue about whether they matter. It’s also interesting to get feedback based on test… (read more)

What’s the best way to give your good presentation?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Every presentation worth doing has just one purpose

Every presentation worth doing has just one purpose: To make a change happen. Before you start working on your presentation, the two-part question to answer is, “who will be changed by this work, and what is the change I seek?

” Every element of your presentation (the room, the attendees, the length, the tone) exists for just one reason: to make it more likely that you will achieve the change you seek. If it doesn’t do that, replace it with some… (read more)

What’s the best way to give your good presentation?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Speaking in public: two errors that lead to fear

Speaking in public: two errors that lead to fear. 1. You believe that you are being actively judged. 2. You believe that the subject of the talk is you. You are not being judged, the value of what you are bringing to the audience is being judged. The members of the audience are interested in themselves. The audience wants to know what they can use, what they can learn, or at the very least, how they can be entertained.

What’s the best way to get your first customers?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: First, ten

Find ten people. Ten people who trust you/respect you/need you/listen to you… Those ten people need what you have to sell, or want it. And if they love it, you win. If they love it, they’ll each find you ten more people (or a hundred or a thousand or, perhaps, just three). Repeat. If they don’t love it, you need a new product. Start over.

What’s the best way to get your first customers?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Hypergrowth

If you make the audience you’re initially serving too big, you will dilute the very thing you set out to make, avoid critical mass, and compromise the magic of what you’re building. You’ll make average stuff for average people instead of something powerful for the few. Fast growth comes from overwhelming the smallest possible audience with a product or service that so delights that they insist that their friends and colleagues use it.

What’s the best way to get your first customers?

Seth Godin (Founder at Yoyodyne Entertainment)
Seth’s Blog: Hypergrowth

If you make the audience you’re initially serving too big, you will dilute the very thing you set out to make, avoid critical mass, and compromise the magic of what you’re building. You’ll make average stuff for average people instead of something powerful for the few. Fast growth comes from overwhelming the smallest possible audience with a product or service that so delights that they insist that their friends and colleagues use it.