What’s the best way to measure product usage?

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
The key success metric for mobile apps | A Founder’s Notebook

A popular metric for measuring retention in the mobile games industry is DAU / MAU, or daily active users divided by monthly active users, and I highly recommend that consumer-facing mobile app developers keep track of that metric as well.

What’s the best way to know if you have product market fit?

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
Lessons Learned: Rapid Iteration for Mobile App Design

the question Sean Ellis popularized, where you ask your users, “How disappointed would you be if you could no longer use our product?” and have them answer with either, “Very Disappointed,” “Somewhat Disappointed,” “Not Disappointed,” or “I no longer use the product. ” Sean did research across hundreds of startups and discovered that companies that had fewer than 40% of their users answer “Very Disappointed” tended to struggle with building a suc… (read more)

What’s the best way to know if you have product market fit?

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
Lessons Learned: Rapid Iteration for Mobile App Design

On a scale from 0-10, how likely are you to recommend us to your friends?” You mark those who answer 0-6 as Detractors, 9-10 as Promoters, and 7-8 as Neutral. Your Net Promoter score is the percent of Promoters minus your percentage of Detractors, which should be a number between -100 and +100. The world’s most successful companies typically score around +50, and top performing tech companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon regularly score over +7… (read more)

What’s the best way to scale your organization?

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Startup Advice – Sam Altman

Here is some of the best startup advice I’ve heard or given (mostly heard): (a) Make something people want and (b) A great team and a great market are both critically important—you have to have both. The debate about which is more important is silly.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
When your product should no longer be your top priority | A Founder’s Notebook

Once you have basic product-market fit, you need to shift your attention to the other elements which will lead to profitable growth.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
MBA Mondays: When Its Not Your Team – AVC

Company building is not this simple, but I do like to think about it terms of two stages. Getting the product right and customers/users scaling. Then scaling the company and the team. If you aren’t doing the first, you mostly don’t need to worry about the second. There are occasional team issues in the first stage you need to deal with but they aren’t the big thing you need to focus on. The big thing you need ot to focus on is the product and its… (read more)

Aaron Patzer (Founder & CEO of Fountain, Mint)
Aaron Patzer lays bare Mint’s numbers – YouTube

The first phase is the garage phase. This is <100k of funding.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
The most important factor in startup success | A Founder’s Notebook

The most important factor in startup success [is product market fit]

Amir Elaguizy (CEO Cratejoy, YC Alumni)
58 things I learned at YC – Giftshop Scientist

Everyone’s problem is money until it’s hiring

Joe Gebbia (Co-Founder & Chief Product Officer at Airbnb)
How Design Thinking Transformed Airbnb from a Failing Startup to a Billion Dollar Business | First Round Review

At Airbnb, the company encourages new employees to ship new features on their first day at the company. It earns them their sea legs and shows that great ideas can come from anywhere. This approach yields results in unexpected ways.

Jerry Colona (Founder @ Reboot.io)
The Management Team – Guest Post By Jerry Colonna – AVC

To me, the hardest part of scaling people is learning to lead your self. We forge our truest identity by facing our fears, our prejudices, our passions, and the source of our aggression.

Drew Houston (Co-Founder & CEO at Dropbox)
Slides: Lean startup lessons that helped Dropbox become a $10B company by Drew Houston – GrowthHackers

Product-market fit cures many sins of management. Mostly ignored: Hiring non-engineers; mainstream PR; traditional messaging / positioning; deadlines, process, “best practices”; having a “real” website; partnerships / bizdev; having lots of features.

David Sacks (CEO at Zenefits)
New Sales Models – David Sacks, Founder and CEO of Yammer – YouTube

Breakout startups must typically innovate on distribution not just product.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
Taking the Mystery out of Scaling a Company – Ben’s Blog

When an organization grows in size, things that were previously easy become difficult. Still, if the company doesn’t expand, then it will never be much of a company, so the challenge is to grow and degrade as slowly as possible.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
Taking the Mystery out of Scaling a Company – Ben’s Blog

Figure out what needs to be communicated. Figure out what needs to be decided. Prioritize the most important communication and decision paths

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
Taking the Mystery out of Scaling a Company – Ben’s Blog

Focus on the output first. Figure out how you’ll know if you are getting what you want at each step. Engineer accountability into the system.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
No Credit for Predicting Rain – Ben’s Blog

At a certain point in the process, no credit will be given for predicting rain. The only credit will be for helping to build an ark.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
CEOs Should Tell It Like It Is – Ben’s Blog

There are three key reasons why being transparent about your company’s problems makes sense: 1. Trust – Without trust, communication breaks. 2. The more brains working on the hard problems, the better. 3. A healthy company culture encourages people to share bad news. A company that discusses its problems freely and openly can quickly solve them. A company that covers up its problems frustrates everyone involved.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
Taking the Mystery out of Scaling a Company – Ben’s Blog

The first rule of organizational design is that all organizational designs are bad. Your goal is to choose the least of all evils.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Tech Ops As A Metaphor For Building, Running, & Leading A Company – AVC

Things that work well at small scale break at large scale – you need different people, processes, and systems as a company grows. You need to instrument your system so you can see when things are reaching the breaking point, well before they break. Overbuilt systems are hard to implement, manage, and scale

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
Lessons Learned: Rapid Iteration for Mobile App Design

What often happens is a startup builds a product people like but don’t love. They’ll typically appear to do well early on, but won’t have enough of a passionate following to achieve meaningful growth or revenues.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
The Management Team – While Building Usage – AVC

Many of the hires that are made in the “building usage” stage are going to report directly to the founder/CEO. The additional product hires may report to you because it is likely that you are running product as well. The community team may report to you. And who is leading that team? The business development person, the marketing person, the admin/finance/HR/legal person, and probably all the sales people are likely reporting to you. Have you eve… (read more)

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
MBA Mondays: When Its Not Your Team – AVC

These issues can play themselves out again when the company is larger. Companies can lose their way. Or their product lineup can get stale. Or competition can enter the market and change the dynamics for users or buyers. Once again, you need to focus in on getting the product right and making sure that it is providing value to customers/users.

Ho Nam (Managing Director at Altos Ventures)
The First Breaking Point – Altos Ventures

Initial – the process is new, ad hoc, chaotic and undocumented. Individual heroics are relied upon to get the job done. Repeatable – the process is somewhat documented. Repeating the same steps may be attempted. It’s not clear if the process will yield desired outputs. Defined – the process is well defined, documented and confirmed as a standard process that can produce results. Managed – the process is quantitatively managed in accordance with a… (read more)

What’s the best way to measure product usage?

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Chartbeat’s suggestion for how to measure content quality | A Founder’s Notebook

Sites that optimize for pageviews inevitably publish provocative headlines and populist content. But time on page isn’t a solution, because shorter articles aren’t necessarily lower quality or less valuable.

Ben Erez (Product at Breeze)
22 Mistakes I Made as a First Time Founder — Viabilify

In hindsight, seeking positive feedback was toxic. It was toxic because it was giving us the impression we were on the right track. I mean, we were on the right track, but we were moving at 1 mph on a track built for bullet trains. Now I know that shipping product, getting sales and not running out of money are the most important things for a B2B startup.

Danielle Morrill (Co-Founder & CEO at Mattermark)
Revenue vs. Value | Danielle Morrill

While revenue is a useful signal to founders, indicating they are creating something people want, it is also a lagging indicator of success. By the time a startup has a predictable and steadily growing revenue stream that means it has built a product and brought it to market successfully.

Brian Balfour (Co-Founder, CMO @ Boundless)
Avoiding The Wheel Of Meaningless Growth

There is a cycle that plagues a lot of companies. It typically works like this: 1. A startup wants some press, so they look for some bloated number to give the writer (downloads, registrations, visits, etc). 2. The startup then celebrates that press article, internally supporting the message that the bloated metric is worth pursuing. 3. In order to get additional press hits, the startup needs to increase that bloated number, so they focus on incr… (read more)

Alistair Croll (Founder of UEM, Author of Lean Analtyics)
The One Metric That Matters | Lean Analytics Book

Transactional sites are about shopping cart conversion, cart size, and abandonment.
Collaboration is about the amount of good content versus bad, and the percent of users that are lurkers versus creators.
SaaS is about time-to-complete-a-task, SLA, and recency of use; and maybe uptime and SLA refunds.
Media is about time on page, pages per visit, and clickthrough rates.
Game startups care about Average Revenue Per User Per Month and Lifetime … (read more)

Josh Kopelman (Partner at First Round)
Founder Office Hours With Chris Dixon And Josh Kopelman: Schedit | TechCrunch

“The real data is retention and repeat usage. ” Startups that focus on the real metrics can make their products better, attract more customers, and make them happier.

Brian Balfour (Co-Founder, CMO @ Boundless)
Avoiding The Wheel Of Meaningless Growth

The one metric that guides us like our north star is Weekly Active Users. We defined this as our authentic growth metric using a few criteria: 1. Retention. In the consumer world things like Daily Active User (DAU) and Weekly Active User (WAU) are most commonly used. Celebrating metrics such as total registrations or downloads over time tell you nothing about whether or not you are building real value. 2. Meaningful interaction. Qualifying events… (read more)

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
The key metric for your startup must satisfy these 4 criteria | A Founder’s Notebook

Reporting metrics as growth rates (or absolute growth) focuses the company on growth, and encourages everyone to think big.

Donald T. Campbell (American social scientist)
There’s a Name for the Big Flaw in Our Obsession With Assessment and Metrics

The more a given metric—say, a national college ranking—is used to evaluate performance in some domain, the less reliable it becomes as a measure of overall success. Why? The people whose performance is being measured will neglect other parts of their job just to focus on boosting the relevant numbers, sometimes to the point of cheating.

Josh Elman (Partner at Greylock Partners)
The only metric that matters — Medium

I always ask the same question: How many people are really using your product? You need a metric that specifically answers this. It can be “x people did 3 searches in the past week”. Or “y people visited my site 9 times in the past month”. Or “z people made at least one purchase in the last 90 days. ” But whatever it is, it should be a signal that they are using their product in the way you expected and that they use it enough so that you believe… (read more)

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
The key success metric for mobile apps | A Founder’s Notebook

A popular metric for measuring retention in the mobile games industry is DAU / MAU, or daily active users divided by monthly active users, and I highly recommend that consumer-facing mobile app developers keep track of that metric as well.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
The corrosive impact of pageviews as the target metric for content websites | A Founder’s Notebook

While quality positively impacts pageviews, there are cheaper levers that are far more powerful. This leads to volumes of low quality content, with no attempt to create or surface the “great stuff”.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Why websites shouldn’t optimize for page views | A Founder’s Notebook

Our key metric at Seeking Alpha is daily, direct users. “Daily” gives you credit for returning visitors, and “direct” only counts people who come for your product and brand, not people who came because they were enticed to click on a syndicated or shared headline.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
The best startup metric: Share of habit? | A Founder’s Notebook

Tom Tunguz argues that share of habit is a better metric for startups to focus on than engagement. Share of habit, however, has disadvantages. You can’t measure it if you don’t have access to accurate market size data and who has that? And its not a good operating metric, as its impacted by external factors out of your control. In that respect, its a vanity metric.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
30/10/10 – AVC

I call this ratio 30/10/10 and so many services that we see exhibit it within a few percentage points here and there. Here’s how it works: 30% of the registered users or number of downloads (if its a mobile app) will use the service each month. 10% of the registered users or number of downloads (if its a mobile app) will use the service each day. The max number of concurrent users of a real-time service will be 10% of the number of daily users.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Do Things that Don’t Scale

We encourage every startup to measure their progress by weekly growth rate.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Do Things that Don’t Scale

Focusing on hitting a growth rate reduces the otherwise bewilderingly multifarious problem of starting a startup to a single problem. You can use that target growth rate to make all your decisions for you; anything that gets you the growth you need is ipso facto right.

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Startup = Growth

A good growth rate during [Y Combinator] is 5-7% a week. If you can hit 10% a week you’re doing exceptionally well. If you can only manage 1%, it’s a sign you haven’t yet figured out what you’re doing. We usually advise startups to pick a growth rate they think they can hit, and then just try to hit it every week.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Social Commerce Is Commerce With A Social Layer – AVC

Conversion rates are critical. They tell you what systems perform best for the end user. When a system converts north of 5% of users visits to a transaction, it is working extremely well for the end user. When a system converts 0.1% of user visits to a transaction, it doesn’t work as well for the end user.

Anamitra Banerji (Partner @ Foundation Capital)
The Shape Of The Curve — Medium

Most consumer software products have a DAU:MAU of 20% or lower. Zero products get to 100% but some rare ones come close to this ceiling (like Facebook 65% and Whatsapp 72%) [i.e. you should be getting better than 20% DAU:MAU]

Eric Ries (Author, The Lean Startup)
The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to … – Eric Ries – Google Books

The most important thing to measure is behavior: would the early participants actively spread the word?

Paul Graham (Co-Founder & Partner at Y Combinator)
Do Things that Don’t Scale

That’s a reasonable proxy for revenue growth because whenever the startup does start trying to make money, their revenues will probably be a constant multiple of active users

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Having Empathy For Your Users – AVC

I feel like the companies we meet with and work with generally do a good job of instrumenting their products and collecting on data on what is working and what is not working. But they often don’t have good answers for why the behavior they are seeing is happening. It’s hard to fix something you know is broken unless you understand why it is broken.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
The Behavior Of Your Users Normally Doesn’t Change Overnight – AVC

I tell this story because we all encounter this sort of thing along the way of building and launching and growing a product. We make tweaks and something changes right away. That immediate change is usually related to something that brought traffic (google, twitter, rss, email, appstore) and not a design change. More gradual changes (up or down) are usually because of design changes. There’s a difference between these two kinds of effects and it … (read more)

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Growth vs Retention – AVC

Entrepreneurs always ask what the one number they should focus on for raising money. I always say “90 day retention numbers for your acquisition cohorts”. There’s a common view in silicon valley and around the tech sector that growth is the one thing you should focus on. But it’s hard to grow if you are churning your users. And if you are paying for user acquisition, as many startups do in search of growth, then retention/churn becomes even more … (read more)

Vasu Vadlamudi (Director of Product, Oscar Insurance)
Growth vs Retention – AVC

For early retention, if your product can be used by a normal user on a daily basis, the “40/20/10” bar is a solid goal. (Of 100 installs on D0, 40 return on D1, 20 on D7, and 10 on D28.)

What’s the best way to know if you have product market fit?

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Before Growth – Sam Altman

A startup that prematurely targets a growth goal often ends up making a nebulous product that some users sort of like and papering over this with growth hacking. That sort of works at least, it will fool investors for awhile until they start digging into retention numbers but eventually the music stops.

Sam Altman (President at Y Combinator)
Before Growth – Sam Altman

I think the right initial metric is do any users love our product so much they spontaneously tell other people to use it? Until that’s a yes, founders are generally better off focusing on this instead of a growth target.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Why startups shouldn’t scale prematurely | A Founder’s Notebook

Don’t scale before you have product-market fit. You’ll burn money, delay true success, and be miserable. What’s so bad about scaling prematurely? Low ROI, high burn rate: Sales and marketing for a product without product-market fit will suffer from low conversions and low renewals. Frustration: When you don’t have product-market fit, everything seems too hard, and everyone is frustrated. Not building permanent value: When you eventually fix your … (read more)

Charlie O’Donnell (Partner Brooklyn Bridge Ventures)
Growth is a Commodity — This is going to be BIG…

If there’s one thing we’ve basically figured out in the digital world, it’s marketing. It’s table stakes. You spend some dollars to get more dollars out. It’s not complicated. That’s why I care much more about engagement–do people like what you built, versus whether or not more people used it today than they did yesterday. Plus, the startup world is littered with companies that grew exponentially without becoming successful–Fab, Turntable, Dailyb… (read more)

Sean Ellis (CEO at GrowthHackers)
Using Survey.io

Here’s an objective metric that removes emotion from the scaling decision while also giving you other important qualitative information. The key question on the survey is: How would you feel if you could no longer use [product]? Very disappointed, Somewhat disappointed, Not disappointed (it isn’t really that useful), N/A – I no longer use [product]. If you find that over 40% of your users are saying that they would be “very disappointed” without … (read more)

Albert Wenger (Partner at Union Square Ventures, Former President of del.icio.us)
Startup Management » Product/Market Fit is a Continuum

You know you’ve achieved product-market fit when the customers intuitively understand what need the product fills for them, and they have no trouble using it, in fact they enjoy using it… in fact they start telling their friends about it, maybe even telling the world about it on Twitter or other places. That’s how you know if you’ve got product-market fit.

Andy Johns (Current VP of Growth at Wealthfront. Formerly growth at Facebook, Twitter, Quora. Ex-EIR Greylock)
Real Engines Of Growth Have Nothing To Do With Growth Hacking | TechCrunch

When you’ve nailed your product, you’ll know it. Your retention will be great and people will happily engage with your emails or push notifications.

Ben Horowitz (Co-Founder & Partner @ Andreessen Horowitz)
The Revenge of the Fat Guy | Marc Andreessen

Myth #1: Product market fit is always a discrete, big bang event. Myth #2: It’s patently obvious when you have product market fit. Myth #3: Once you achieve product market fit, you can’t lose it. Myth #4: Once you have product-market fit, you don’t have to sweat the competition

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Product-market fit can be hard to spot | A Founder’s Notebook

Product-market fit is a continuum, not a single point. But if you’re not in “the zone”, you know it. Everything feels too hard.

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Four myths about product-market fit | A Founder’s Notebook

My personal view is that product-market fit is a continuum; there are degrees of product-market fit. You should only scale when it’s clear that you’re fairly far along the continuum of product-market fit.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Burn Rate – AVC

It is dangerous to ramp up headcount and burn until you are certain that you have the right product and the right people and processes in the organization to support the product. And early revenue traction, often driven by a passionate founder, can be a nasty head fake.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Product > Strategy > Business Model – AVC

Getting product right means finding product market fit. It does not mean launching the product. It means getting to the point where the market accepts your product and wants more of it.

Jerry Neuman (Venture Capitalist at Neu Venture Capital)
How to kiss your elbow | Reaction Wheel

Marc Andreessen says “you can always feel product/market fit when it’s happening. ” Unfortunately, this is simply not true. In B-to-B startups you can have a lot of buzz and a few amazing clients banging your door down and still have a product that doesn’t really do much. Or you can have a product that is absolutely amazing that great clients are beta-testing but that no one is paying for.

William Mougayar (Chief Evangelist, Advocate Marketing at Influitive, formerly CEO/founder of Engagio)
Startup Management » Product/Market Fit is a Continuum

If there is no market, even a great product and a great team will not get you there. if you can’t realize the business model, there is no Product/Market Fit. If there is no retention and referrals, there is no Product/Market Fit. Instead of building new features, or rebuilding from scratch, try pointing your product at a new market.

Marc Andreesen (Co-Founder & General Partner at Andreessen Horowitz)
How you know when you’ve hit product-market fit | A Founder’s Notebook

You can always feel when product/market fit isn’t happening. The customers aren’t quite getting value out of the product, word of mouth isn’t spreading, usage isn’t growing that fast, press reviews are kind of “blah”, the sales cycle takes too long, and lots of deals never close. And you can always feel product/market fit when it’s happening. The customers are buying the product just as fast as you can make it — or usage is growing just as fast a… (read more)

Paul Buchheit (Partner at Y Combinator)
Default Alive or Default Dead?

A related problem that I see a lot is premature scaling—founders take a small business that isn’t really working (bad unit economics, typically) and then scale it up because they want impressive growth numbers. This is similar to over-hiring in that it makes the business much harder to fix once it’s big, plus they are bleeding cash really fast.

Raju Rishi (General Partner @ RRE Ventures)
When Revenue Isn’t The Answer

Closed deals and sales velocity are not exclusive measures of product/ market fit. Maybe, among your first customers, there are wide variations in the core use cases for the product. Maybe your team is struggling with lengthy sales cycles. Maybe you find yourself significantly altering your pitch for different target customers and creating multiple marketing messages along the way

Eric Ries (Author, The Lean Startup)
The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses

Startups occasionally ask me to help them evaluate whether they have achieved product/market fit. It’s easy to answer: if you are asking, you’re not there yet. (p.219)

Naval Ravikant (Founder, CEO & Co – Maintainer at AngelList)
“The Anatomy of a Fundable Startup”, by Naval Ravikant (Founder, AngelList) on Vimeo

How much traction is enough? How much growth in enough? It depends a lot on the startup, but generally an investor will not be impressed if you say we’re growing at 10% a month. That means you’ll double in a year and believe it or not in the startup game that’s not enough for an early stage company.

Naval Ravikant (Founder, CEO & Co – Maintainer at AngelList)
“The Anatomy of a Fundable Startup”, by Naval Ravikant (Founder, AngelList) on Vimeo

Whatever your core metric is you want to grow that by 20% per month.

Fred Wilson (Co-Founder and Partner at Union Square Ventures)
Growth – AVC

Things like gaming Facebook’s open graph can temporarily stimulate growth that is not sustainable long term. Investors can be faked out by things like that. Gaming Google’s search algorithms is another way that has been done in the past. When we look at growth, we look for authentic, organic, and sustainable growth that is not overly dependent on a single source, particularly a source the startup doesn’t control. That takes some experience to det… (read more)

Raju Rishi (General Partner @ RRE Ventures)
When Revenue Isn’t The Answer

Achieving product/ market fit is the transformative moment in the life of a startup. It is the moment of metamorphosis, where a company aligns messaging, marketing, target customers, sales methodology, product roadmap, and operating metrics. This moment cannot be bypassed, faked, overlooked, or ignored. So be disciplined. Don’t get caught up in the expectations of customers, investors, or yourselves. For in the absence of product market fit, more… (read more)

David Jackson (Founder, Seeking Alpha)
Startup strategy: Why you have to demand commitment | A Founder’s Notebook

In Seeking Alpha, we wanted to keep our content free, but wanted to ensure our users valued it. So we forced our users to register. Our thinking was “We’re not interested in a relationship where you don’t value our product enough to register for free”.

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
Lessons Learned: Rapid Iteration for Mobile App Design

the question Sean Ellis popularized, where you ask your users, “How disappointed would you be if you could no longer use our product?” and have them answer with either, “Very Disappointed,” “Somewhat Disappointed,” “Not Disappointed,” or “I no longer use the product. ” Sean did research across hundreds of startups and discovered that companies that had fewer than 40% of their users answer “Very Disappointed” tended to struggle with building a suc… (read more)

Mariya Yao (Founder at Xanadu)
Lessons Learned: Rapid Iteration for Mobile App Design

On a scale from 0-10, how likely are you to recommend us to your friends?” You mark those who answer 0-6 as Detractors, 9-10 as Promoters, and 7-8 as Neutral. Your Net Promoter score is the percent of Promoters minus your percentage of Detractors, which should be a number between -100 and +100. The world’s most successful companies typically score around +50, and top performing tech companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon regularly score over +7… (read more)

Slava Akhmechet (Founder at RethinkDB)
57 startup lessons

Product comes first. If people love your product, the tiniest announcements will get attention. If people don’t love your product, no amount of marketing effort will help.

Kissmetrics (Built to optimize marketing. Track, analyze and optimize your digital marketing.)
13 Critically Important Lessons from Over 50 Growth Hackers

Leaky buckets don’t need more water, they need their holes fixed.